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Welcome (back) to Mixed Media Artist!

Hi, I'm Cyndi, and I've been writing and updating  Mixed Media Artist since 2005.  If you're a new visitor, welcome! Come tr...

Monday, June 18, 2018

Infinity rings - an alcohol ink tutorial


I had been wondering how people got multiple rings to form with alcohol inks.  Simply plopping an additional drop of ink into an already formed ring was not doing the trick, and more often was resulting in the original ring dissolving!  YouTube to the rescue :-)

It takes some practice, but it's really not difficult.  You'll want to work in one small area at a time, and when you begin, keep your starting puddles somewhere between the size of a quarter and a half dollar coin.  Follow these simple steps:

1. Put a drop or two of ink into a small puddle of 91% alcohol.  Use a squeeze bottle for your plain alcohol to control the amount.

2. Use a hair drier or a heat gun to blow around the outside of the puddle, pointing it towards the center. Move the air quickly so that the ink doesn't dry in one spot.  Try for multiple rings, and try not to let the moving alcohol lap over the edges of your puddle.

3. If you don't get as many rings as you'd like, add a small drop of additional ink to the center and repeat step 2.



This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Book review: Artful Alphabets


Artful Alphabets
by Joanne Sharpe

Joanne Sharpe has done it again!  In her first book (shown below), Joanne taught the basics of creating hand lettered alphabets that didn't take years of calligraphy practice to master.  In her newest (shown above), she shares 55 new ideas and fonts that you can try, tweak, and make your own!

If you don't own the first book, don't let that stop you from getting Artful Alphabets.  The basics are covered again.  Joanne's style is light and whimsical, but you can easily morph the imagery being used to suit your own style.  Personally, I have always disliked my own handwriting, and I really appreciate Joanne's admonition to embrace it and see what comes out!  The biggest adjustment I've had to make is to remember that I am *drawing* my letters, not simply writing them!





This post contains affiliate links


Monday, June 11, 2018

Wet into dry method with alcohol inks - a tutorial


Last week, I showed you the first of several techniques that I've been using to experiment with alcohol inks.  Here are some of the other pieces that I made using this wet into dry method.


To recap, you drip your alcohol ink colors onto a dry background.  They can sit there and dry, or you can begin working with them while they're still wet.  Using 91% rubbing alcohol in a squeeze bottle, you add the solvent to one small area at a time, manipulating the running inks with a blower.  You can use a hair dryer (set on cool), canned air, a heat gun (at a distance), or even just a straw.


One of the things I most like about this method is the airy, wispy, ethereal look that you can get.



This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, June 04, 2018

Fire on High - an alcohol ink painting tutorial

Fire on High
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

Since I am pathologically organized, I just had to set aside time to systematically try out all of the different methods of painting the alcohol ink that I'd seen.  My favorite video tutorials are all linked up in my Alcohol ink Pinterest board, so take a look if you want even more.  Also, don't forget Cathy Taylor's excellent book, which I've reviewed here.   I'll be showing you my results over the next few weeks.

For the first go, I decided to try the technique where you drip your alcohol ink colors onto a dry background.  Using 91% rubbing alcohol in a squeeze bottle, I added the solvent to one small area at a time, manipulating the running inks with a blower.  You can use a hair dryer (set on cool), canned air, a heat gun (at a distance), or even just a straw.

Even now that I've worked through about a dozen different techniques, this continues to be one of my favorites.  You can control about 30% of the outcome, slightly more as you get more adept at handling the air.

I was super in love with Fire on High, and then I had to go and experiment further on it.  And I ruined it!  But not to worry...I scanned it at high resolution first.  Since alcohol inks don't appear to be trustworthily archival, my digital piece is more important to me in the long run than the physical piece I ruined! 


This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Mixed media + collage board on Pinterest




Just like for every other topic that interests me, I've been collecting tutorials and glorious examples of mixed media and collage work into a Pinterest board.  It is titled (surprisingly!) Mixed media + collage  :-)   The work is mostly, but not entirely, paper based.  Really, I've included everything that catches my eye that isn't pure fabric!  There are already plenty of boards there for fabric, including Art quilts, Quilting tutorials, Hand embroidery, Crazy quilt details, Fabrics transformed, Fabric + fiber art, Crochet, and more more more!

Monday, May 28, 2018

Using glossy book pages for your alcohol ink paintings

Hunter's Moon
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

In the process of fooling around with alcohol inks, I started looking for other substrates that would work besides the ever-present Yupo paper, freezer paper, and glossy photo paper (I know there are many more!), and I came up with glossy book or magazine pages.  Since most glossy magazines have gone to thinner paper these days, books seemed like the best bet. 

Venice
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

Sure enough, I tore out a few pages from a coffee table book that I'd been planning to use forever to do something, anything!  The inks worked really well.  Obviously, the patterns and colors underneath show through to some extent, so you never quite know what you're gonna get.  But isn't that the case with alcohol inks anyway? :-)

This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

More inspiration...Bridges, pathways, stairs, and doors




You can never have too much inspiration.  I think the only downside for me is that very occasionally I just don't know which of my idea strings to tug on next, but that is something I put into the box of good problems to have.  As long as it doesn't make me freeze up!  If you missed it, I've also got a Pinterest board simply entitled Photo inspirations, with macros, cityscapes, landscapes, and seascapes. 

Monday, May 21, 2018

Spring Synapses – an alcohol ink painting tutorial

Spring Synapses
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

This alcohol ink piece gave me a chance to experiment with several methods of adding details to a background.


The background was first created by starting with 91% rubbing alcohol all over the page.  I dropped small puddles of analogous alcohol ink colors into the plain alcohol and allowed them to spread and mix and mingle.  In a few areas, I directed traffic, but mostly I just let them do what they wanted.



When it was dry (which doesn't take that long!), I added several layers of embellishments.  I started with India ink, which does not reactivate the alcohol inks.  My favorite is the waterproof black India ink which I can apply using small pipettes.  Aiming directly at the center of the small puddle, I used a straw to forcefully blow the ink outwards in all directions.

After my initial ink splots were dry, I added more smaller tendrils with a fine point black Pitt Pen.  Pitt Pens are India ink based, so they also do not reactivate the alcohol.  The final touch, the white dots, were applied by Posca Paint markers, another opaque water-based pen that also pair well with alcohol inks.     



This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, May 14, 2018

Rain – an alcohol ink landscape tutorial

Rain
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

I'm not completely satisfied with this alcohol ink landscape, but it's my best so far!  I've clearly still got a lot to learn.



I started at the top and let each layer almost dry before adding the next.  Some of the sections (like the middle right side blue), I worked on texture with plastic wrap.  I added small drops of additional ink to some sections to create the pebbled effect.  For the sky, I took an old credit card and dipped the edge in rubbing alcohol.  I think I like the sky and the muted sun the best of all the sections.

The tree was the final addition, after everything was thoroughly dry and I had a chance to think about it for awhile.  I added the tree with a fine point Pitt Pen, my favorite pen to use for tiny details.  Pitt Pens are India ink based.  You could also use alcohol based markers like Permapaques.  I'm still mostly using the alcohol inks that I made myself (tutorial link), but I've also started supplementing with some Pinata inks.


This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Photo inspirations




If you're anything like me, you find photo images very inspiring to browse through when you're looking for your next idea for a color palette, composition, or even theme.  I've put together a Pinterest board that has several sections: Macros and close-ups, Cityscapes, Landscapes, and Seascapes. 

Monday, May 07, 2018

Alcohol inks get easier...

Hydrangeas
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

...but not much less frustrating!  I would say that at this point, I've got about 33% control and 67% luck.  I am still using mostly my own homemade alcohol inks (tutorial at the link), but I've supplemented them with some brand name metallic inks and an opaque white.

I've tried both India ink and alcohol-based markers like my beloved Pitt pens or Permapaque markers to add details after the painting dries, and I really like both about equally.  It just depends upon what exactly I want to add.  In the Hydrangeas piece shown above, I wish that I had used white ink markers instead of the black.  So in the next piece, I experimented with white.



For Spring Frenzy, I started with some plain alcohol on the page, and dropped ink puddles into it.  I covered it with plastic wrap and and allowed it to dry completely.  The wrap is what made the lines and the appearance of texture.


To the dried background, I added drops of White India ink and used a straw to blow them outward.  I finished them off by adding some small details with colored Permapaque markers.

This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Some early experiments with alcohol inks

Rainbow Gravity
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

Whenever I start up with a new medium, I always expect it to be easy.  I don't know why.  Experience has certainly not borne out this cock-eyed optimistic view of life, but nonetheless...

So, I'm humbly sharing some of my earliest "paintings" with alcohol inks.  Yikes!  Over time, I have gotten better, though I'm nowhere near the proficiency level of the best pieces that you see on Pinterest!

Please visit my tutorial on making your own alcohol inks.  It's way way cheaper than buying them ready-made, though as I get better at working with them, I may decide to add some of the Pinata or Ranger colors.  I know the pieces that follow are not that good...they are my baby beginner practice pieces!




This post contains an affiliate link: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Falling Further In - an acrylic pour mixed media painting tutorial

Falling Further In
Cyndi Lavin, 2018


I have been trying some different swipe methods with my acrylic pours, and I recently stumbled onto a technique that I REALLY like.  A lot!  Here's what I did:


1. Since I was just experimenting, I used an old masonite board that already had some dried puddles on it.  You can see the rough surface in the middle.  After painting the background with Black gesso, I added my paints on the diagonal as you can see.  The basic formula for all of the paints is as follows:
1 part heavy bodied acrylic paint
2 parts GAC100
9 to 12 parts Floetrol or GAC800
Dash of 91% rubbing alcohol
Spray of silicone (except in the base color, white)


2. Here are the colors I used: Titanium white, Medium magenta, Hansa yellow light, Cobalt teal, Dioxazine purple



3. I used an old plastic card to drag the paint from the center towards one corner.




4. I added more paint and swiped it towards the opposite corner. 



5. After living with it for awhile (and letting it dry completely), I chose an orientation and applied a paper mask to the piece.  Outside of the mask was hit by some thinned White gesso with a foam roller.  The black lines are waterproof India ink

Prints are for sale at the link
This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Book review: Sew Creative


Do you enjoy sewing with children or grandchildren?  Do you want them to learn how to use a sewing machine but also how to do hand stitching beautifully?  My personal opinion of some books that try to do these things is...boring!  No kids want to make uncool, unhip, untrendy projects just to learn some skills.

What they do want are projects like these, which you'll find in Sew Creative by Jennifer Pol Colin:

 
Mermaid tail blanket


Chalkboard backpack

Click on this table of contents to see it larger

You'll notice that most of the projects are for beginners and intermediates.  Only one is considered difficult enough that help will probably be needed.  However, working alongside a child (either both working on one or each doing your own) will definitely add a lot to the fun!  I think a couple of Animal Neck Pillows are needed by my two grands!

Monday, April 16, 2018

Moonrise – a mixed media painting tutorial

Moonrise in December
Cyndi Lavin, 2017
Prints for sale

I showed you late last year how to do one of these deeper-toned paintings by using an underpainting (tutorial link).  For the painting at the link, I used India ink, but for this one I used a mix of a mix of black gesso and white gesso, as you can see below.  If you need additional details about how I did this painting, check the other tutorial for more step-by-steps.    

 

I used a mixed medium dark gray gesso to pull the top half with Phthalo blue and Dioxazine purple.  On the bottom, I used a lighter gray to pull Dioxazine purple, Quinacridone magenta, and Pyrrole orangeLet it dry.

   

On the bottom half, I added glazes of Hansa yellow light and Pyrrole orange.  After that dried, I touched up with the original colors mixed with White gesso.  When dry again, use a pipette to drip waterproof black India ink for trees.  My final step was to splatter the piece with a mix of Hansa yellow light and White gesso.  I should have done that before adding the trees!  Next time!



This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Crochet mania!




Last Monday, I shared a tutorial for crocheting a wave stitch scarf.  Also, there were other links to tutorials that I posted on Beading Arts:
Part one
Part two
Part three

If you enjoy crochet as either a mainstay or sideline of your artistic diet, please visit my Crochet Pinterest board for more projects, links to stitch tutorials, and inspiration!


Monday, April 09, 2018

Ribbon of Blood + Broken Hearts - an acrylic pour painting tutorial

Ribbon of Blood + Broken Hearts
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

Like everyone else, I cried the day that seventeen lovely people were murdered at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.  That is was Valentine's Day only made it worse.  Instead of celebrating young love, we mourned the loss.

I don't tend to make a lot of political statements, and I'm not usually one to attend protests or rallies.  I have nothing against these things, they are just not my mode of being.  Instead, I vote.  I pray.  I make art.  I donate money where I think it will help.  The piece above, Ribbon of Blood + Broken Hearts, came from my sorrow following that ugly day.

It's taken me two months to post it here, because I wanted to be able to share the materials and the process with you, but at the time it was just too raw.


1. I decided to use the pour and tilt method of liquid acrylic pouring.  Gesso your masonite boards and let it dry.  Place it inside an aluminum pan, raised up on small cups.  Make sure the surface is completely level. 




2. Mix your paints.  This is how I did it:
  • Small blob of heavy bodied paint in a small cup.
  • Equal amount of GAC 100 (a Golden product).  Stir well.
  • Add self-leveling medium or GAC 800 equal to or more than the total amount above.  Stir well
  • Water, added a small amount at a time and stirred in thoroughly until the mixture pours easily.  This is the hard part to know how much.
  • A shot or two of silicone.  Quick mix just before pouring.


3. The colors I used were Yellow ochre with Red oxide, Dioxazine purple with Titanium whiteRed oxide with Quinacridone burnt orange, Cerulean blue, Green gold with Sap green.  Make four puddles of ochre on the masonite board, and top each with a smaller puddle of purple, red, blue, and green.  Tilt the board and let the colors run.  I added more red and swirled a skewer through it.  Re-level it and allow the cells to start to form.



4. I used Faber-Castell Pitt pens to do the sketching after the piece dried.  You can see that more cells formed as it sat.


This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, April 04, 2018

New gallery at Fine Art America

Particle Shower Do-Si-Dos
Cyndi Lavin, 2018


Last month, I mounted some of my paintings and got them ready for sale.  In my stumbling-around way, I eventually landed on FineArtAmerica, and decided that would be my new gallery home.  Right now I have a selection of pieces from my physics series available, and I am planning on adding more pieces: trees, geometrics, more from physics, and other abstracts.  If there is a particular piece that you'd like to have, please just message me at beadingarts at gmail dot com, and I will be happy to upload it there for you.

Prints are available in quite a few sizes, from 5.5x8 inches to around 3x4 feet!  And they start at only $20 for the three smallest sizes. 




Monday, April 02, 2018

Making your own alcohol inks


I've been playing around with alcohol inks lately.  I love the bright, over-the-top saturated colors, but I don't love the price.  Looking around online, I found several suggestions for making your own, but some of them neglected to take into account the differences in pigment vs dye in the markers, and the difference in the effectiveness of 91% rubbing alcohol vs regular 70%.

Sun Drenched Icicles
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

I have gotten much much better results with dye-based markers.  Most (not all) permanent markers are dye-based.  Here's an article you can read if you want to know about the chemical difference, and which markers are which.



So what do you do?  Just pull off the point of the pen and put it in a small glass jar.  I used those tiny little jars that you get jelly in at Christmas time!  Pry apart of cut off the end of the pen and slide out the plastic covered reservoir from the center.  I recommend gloves!  It doesn't matter if it's dried up or fresh.  Cut it up to fit in the bottle and cover the pieces with 91% rubbing alcohol.  Shake, and let it sit overnight.


You will have to experiment with amounts, but it's pretty much impossible to make them too concentrated. since you can always thin them down with more alcohol.  If they are too diluted, you can pour them out into a plastic palette and let them evaporate somewhat.  I transferred my inks into little squeeze bottles so that I could control the drips better, but this isn't necessary if you're going to do mostly brush work.

I use freezer paper instead of the pricier Yupo paper, because I'm cheap!  Well, that and because I'm just getting started and don't want to waste expensive paper :-)

I have some resources here, with links to my Pinterest board on alcohol inks and the best book I've found on the subject. 

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, March 26, 2018

Making a wave stitch scarf - a tutorial

My Dr Who Scarf
Cyndi Lavin, 2018

My deepest appreciation to Cori Dodds, who designed the scarf that I first saw using the wave stitch.  She got the wave stitch from MyPicot.com, home of gazillions of stitches that I now want to try!  Scroll down to the bottom of this post for easy instructions for my version of the wave stitch.


If you are a beginner crocheter, I would suggestion that you go to MyPicot and follow the instructions there for doing the stitch.  I am abbreviating everything here, because teaching crochet is just not my strong suit.  I also changed the stitch slightly from the original, to better suit the way I work.  This one only looks complicated though, I promise you!

Wave Stitch - lengthwise


Wave Stitch Instructions

The basic pattern is 16 stitches in each repeat, plus 3 at the end to finish.  So if you want to make my Dr Who scarf with the pattern running crosswise, you'll start with a chain of 35 (+ 1 stitch to turn).  A 36" traditional scarf with the pattern running lengthwise needs about 8 repeats, so chain 131 (+ 1 stitch to turn).  And if you want to make an infinity loop, I found 6 repeats to be perfect for me, so I chained 99 (+ 1 stitch to turn).  It's easy to work out for yourself if you want a different size.

Here's how the pattern works, using the 2 repeat pattern as an example:

Chain 35 + 1 to turn.
Each stitch or chain in the following rows corresponds to 1 stitch in the base chain, so when you ch 1, skip the stitch below it.

row 1: *sc3, ch1, hdc, ch1, dc, ch1, trc, ch1, trc, ch1, dc, ch1, hdc, ch1, repeat from *.  End with sc3.

rows 2 + 3: sc in each stitch (including chains) in front loop only.

row 4: same pattern as row 1, but starting with trc.  *trc, ch1, trc, ch1, dc, ch1, hdc, ch1, sc3, ch1, hdc, ch1, dc, ch1, repeat from *.  End with trc, ch1, trc.

rows 4 + 5: repeat rows 2 + 3.

Alternate rows 1 + 4, adding rows 2 + 3 between each repeat.


Other crochet tutorial links, found on Beading Arts:
Part one
Part two
Part three

Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Quilting inspiration on Pinterest



I love looking at art quilt books, magazines, and gazing at online examples!  It didn't take long before I decided I had to have an Art quilts board on Pinterest to collect up all the beautiful and inspirational images I was finding.  But before too long, some tutorials started creeping in, and in the interest of being able to find them again, I started a separate board...




...which I cleverly named simply Quilting tutorials!  Please visit them both :-)




Monday, March 19, 2018

Mounting raw-edged paintings - a tutorial

Anti-Doesn't Matter
Cyndi Lavin, 2017
Original and prints for sale

There's a special way that I mount acrylic paintings when they're painted on paper and have interesting raw edges I want to show off rather than hide.  Framing is time-consuming because of the number of times you have to let things dry, so I like to frame many pieces at the same time.  I bought Dick Blick's super-value cradled wood panels.  I can get packages of 5 panels, 9x12", 3/4" thick for around $25 each pack.  The additional materials I needed are as follows:

Flat surface with a drop cloth or paper
Ruler and pencil
Small paper cups
Waxed or parchment paper 
Foam roller or brush
Brayer
1" paint brush
Carbon black acrylic paint
Krylon acrylic spray
Gloss medium
Gloss varnish
Matte varnish (or Satin, if you prefer)



1. Paint the sides and the edges of the clean wood panel with black acrylic paint.  Allow to dry completely.  Use your ruler and pencil to make very small dots where each corner of your painting will go.

2. If your painting hasn't already been sprayed with clear acrylic spray, do that now and let it dry.  Use a foam roller or brush to coat both the back of the painting and the surface of the wood panel (inside the lines where the painting will sit) with thin layers of gloss medium.  Place the painting carefully and brayer it down from the middle outward, being careful not to let the painting slip.  Place it on waxed paper on a super-flat surface and weight it down to dry overnight.


      

3. Place your painting up on several small paper cups and begin to apply the varnish with a 1" brush.  Begin with the gloss varnish and apply 3 thin coats, letting each dry completely.  Make sure you get the sides too.  I like a total of 5 coats, and even though I want these pieces to be finished matte, I still start with gloss varnish.  Too many layers of matte or satin varnish begin to look cloudy, whereas gloss varnish always stays nice and clear.  Also, matte varnish can sometimes dull the colors if it applied directly to the painting. 



4. Here the piece has 3 coats of gloss varnish, the current coat not completely dry yet.  Once it is dry, I will finish with 2 coats of matte varnish, letting each dry.  No more than 2 coats of either matte or satin on top of the base of 3 coats of gloss varnish!  I know, I'm repeating myself, but this is important!!



Here is a complete list of all the pieces in this series.  Originals and prints are available at this link:
Sacred Geometry
Charmed Particles
Anti-Doesn't Matter
Do Magnets Dream of Electron Pairs?
Gravity Waves a Fond Farewell
Circuit-ous
(Really) Tiny Bubbles
Strange(er) in the Night
Particle Shower Do-Si-Dos
Just Passing Through
Neutrino Dreams

A tutorial for the basic techniques used in these paintings is at the link.

This post contains affiliate links: Dick Blick


Copyright 2018 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. The tutorial only may be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.
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