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Hi, I'm Cyndi, and I've been writing and updating  Mixed Media Artist since 2005.  If you're a new visitor, welcome! Come tr...

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Making monotype background papers


Monotype background papers are loads of fun to make...you'll feel like a finger-painting child again. Just gather up some acrylics, a glass or plastic sheet (even parchment or waxed paper will do in a pinch), some papers cut to size, and any mark making tools that you wish. I used nothing but sponges, a brayer, and my fingers!



1. Place a dab of each color that you wish to use in a small plastic cup. Thin the paints with water so that they will move freely on the glass or plastic surface.

2. Use masking tape to block off the size of the area that you wish to paint on your glass. You will be applying paints to the glass surface, not directly to the papers. The slick surface allows the paints to move freely as you manipulate them, until you are satisfied with the design.

3. Play with your paints on the glass surface. The addition of water to the mix will allow you additional manipulation time, but don't allow them to dry out. Try not to over-manipulate them either, or you'll end up with muddy colors.

4. Take your first piece of prepared paper and lower it to the surface. You can roll it on carefully or just drop in on. You can also slide it around slightly if you'd like an extra serendipity factor. Smooth lightly, and roll it back up from the surface.


You can often get at least two more prints from the same surface, each one lighter than the one before, like these.





Here's another batch:



The wavy surface was obtained by my use of a textured glass surface. Think creatively in what you use as the surface for your monotypes, and have fun!



Copyright 2009 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


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Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Making a rusted fabric art quilt


A while ago, I shared the directions for making rusted fabric with you. At the time, I wasn't sure what I was going to use the fabric for, but eventually the idea came to me to stamp paint some metallic swirls and circles on it to fill it out, and to turn it into a small quilt. Here's how this piece came to be, step by step.

Create some rusted fabric or choose whatever fabric you want for the background.


Choose some stamps (preferably ones you've made) and a metallic acrylic paint or two to stamp with. I chose Metallic Rust Lumiere, by Jaquard.





Using foil adhesive, apply foil shapes to your surface. I used the foam brush to make three rectangles with the adhesive. After it dried, I applied foil and rubbed it into place.


Stitch the surface fabric to a piece of cotton batting. The threads I used are metallic, but they don't show up well in this photo. After anchoring the top and batting together, I embellished with some beads. Then, keeping right sides together, stitch the quilt to a backing on three sides, and then turn it right side out. Turn under the raw edges to the inside, and stitch around the entire edge, just an eigth to a quarter of an inch inside the edge.



Copyright 2008 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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