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Hi, I'm Cyndi, and I've been writing and updating  Mixed Media Artist since 2005.  If you're a new visitor, welcome! Come tr...

Monday, July 25, 2016

"They toil not"

They Toil Not
Cyndi Lavin, 2016


I was never quite satisfied with the piece I made back in February, called Intentional (there's a tutorial at the link).  After messing around with it for awhile, I decided that I simply needed to crop it and do a bit of digital rearrangement, adding the bottom horizontal stripe up higher.  Of course, my new version only exists digitally, but I am much happier with it for some reason!

Matthew 6:28 (KJV):
And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin

Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, July 18, 2016

A "honeycomb" collage piece


Just playing around with bubble wrap one day, I painted this simple piece. No, it doesn't really look like honeycomb until you crop it and use it in a piece that suggests that!  But for lack of a better name, honeycomb has stuck :-)



I morphed the colors in Photoshop and cropped it severely to use in The Pedigree of Honey, which I showed you a few weeks ago.  So maybe you'll find it useful to have a piece like this in your pile of papers, ready to use for digital or physical collage.


Acrylic paints:
Burnt sienna
Raw umber
Red oxide
Phthalo blue
Phthalo green

1. Using a wet in wet technique, I covered the entire watercolor paper with the first three colors listed above.  Then I scrunched up waxed paper and allowed the paints to dry with it on top.

2. I mixed Phthalo blue and Phthalo green, and applied it with bubble wrap.

3. Add a raw sienna glaze, and before it's completely dry, spray with water and alcohol.

4.  When the piece is dry, go back in and sponge with red oxide and burnt sienna as desired.

Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Torn paper towel flowers


Nothing gets my juices flowing quite like a beautiful bouquet of flowers!  And since my garden has been overflowing, I've had lots of inspiration recently.  I don't do realism...I just can't...but I wanted something that would at least be recognizable this time!

Materials & Tools

Watercolor paper
Gesso
Matte medium
Tissue paper
Paper towels
Spray bottle with water

Acrylic paints:
Hansa yellow medium
Pyrrole orange
Quinacridone magenta
Dioxazine purple
Jenkins green
Sap green
Green gold

Pitt pen, black
Acrylic spray fixative


1. Pick a reference photo or quickly sketch a plan.  My drawing ability is non-existent, but I still do this part.



2. Prepare watercolor paper with a thin layer of gesso, a layer of dilute matte medium, and crinkled tissue paper.  Let it dry.



3. Drip dilute color on paper towels and allow to dry.



4. Add dilute sap green to the paper and use a spray bottle of water to move it around.  Top it with a layer of matte medium and allow to dry thoroughly.



5. Use water on a small brush to outline the flowers, and tear them out.



6. Arrange, adhering with a drop of medium when satisfied.



7. Iron in place.  Add small paper towel details, like the leaves.  Iron in place again and carefully cover with medium.



8. Add desired details with a pen.  spray with fixative, and add a final layer of matte medium.



Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

Monday, July 04, 2016


Monday, June 27, 2016

Dish soap resist experiment


The June/July issue of Quilting Arts had an article in it by Julie Booth on using dish soap as a resist on cloth.  I've done that before, and it suddenly occurred to me that it might work very nicely on paper as well, so I set off to experiment.

Materials & Tools

Dish soap (I used Dawn, because that's what I had!)
Watercolor paper
Stamps
Black acrylic
India ink
Colored acrylics, Inktense pencils, etc

1. This first card was stamped all over, simply using my finger.  After allowing it to dry, I painted it with 1/2 India ink (left) and the other half thinned black acrylic.



2. After rinsing off the soap, you can see that both sides faded, but the ink side faded the most.



3. Because it's pretty faded, softer colors showed up really nicely when diluted and brushed over the piece.



4. In the spirit of experimenting, I made another piece that used undiluted black acrylic.  I really don't like the look of this one nearly as much, but it may have its uses.



5. The take-home lesson for me was to not make the black acrylic too dark, and experiment more with different strengths of colored acrylics and pencils.  I like the spiral piece the most, and will probably use it in something soon.


Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, June 20, 2016

The Pedigree of Honey



The pedigree of honey
Does not concern the bee;
A clover, any time, to him
Is aristocracy.
Emily Dickinson, 1924 


Materials & Tools

Painted background paper
Various collage papers already painted, like "Lavender" from last week
Vintage bee image from The Graphics Fairy

Photoshop


1. Choose and scan all images and the background that you wish to use.  Scan at least at 300dpi if you are going to want to be able to print out your piece in the future.



2. Size and arrange digital collage pieces, and fade the edges.  Adjust colors as needed and play with the opacity of each.

3. Another way to integrate pieces that don't fade in nicely is to cover them with another transparent layer of the background, and erase as needed to allow the image to show.

Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.
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