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Hi, I'm Cyndi, and I've been writing and updating  Mixed Media Artist since 2005.  If you're a new visitor, welcome! Come tr...

Monday, October 27, 2008

Rusted fabrics




Take one well-rusted object:




Wrap it in a cloth that has been saturated with white vinegar and let it sit overnight:




Unwrap the cloth and hang it to finish drying. Iron when dry:



I'll figure out a project to use this for later! Happy rusting :-)

Copyright 2008 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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Tuesday, October 07, 2008

Making Ghost in the Wall (fabric collage)


I love to use my digital images in physical work! I never have to worry about copyright issues. I know that my images can be as mundane or as bizarre as the situation calls for. But mostly, after spending a lot of time at the computer, I like to step away and get my hands dirty, so to speak!

For this little art quilt collage, you’ll need to gather up some items, including the fabrics and interfacing that you want to use, the printed out image, some embellishments, and the tools: a cutting board and rotary cutter (or scissors), an iron, awl, hammer, eyelet setter, needles and threads, wire cutters, and chain nose pliers. Here are the steps that I already took to create the digital image that I’m using for this project.

1. Print out the image that you wish to use on Ink jet T-shirt transfer paper. Cut it to size.


2. Cut out the interfacing (I used Timtex for this piece, a very heavy and stiff fabric), and cut your front fabric 4 inches longer and wider. Center the fabric on the front of the interfacing, and wrap it around to the back, creating mitered corners as shown above. Use a hot iron to crease the mitered folds sharply, but don't adhere or stitch them down yet.


3. Iron the image onto muslin according to the directions on the package of transfer paper.


4. Use your awl, eyelet setter and hammer to insert eyelets into each corner and wherever else you'd like to attach embellishments. I use the top two for hanging the piece, and the ones across the bottom for hanging dangles.


5. Stitch on the surface embellishments. Bury the threads in the back under the fabric flaps as much as possible. This is why you don't want to stitch them down in the beginning; the eyelets in the corners will hold the fabric from slipping while you work. Finish by stitching the mitered corners together and to the interfacing.


6. Decide what your piece needs for hanging embellishments.


7. Use your wire cutters and pliers to hang the dangles. You can also add fancier hooks to the top two holes, but I didn't want to on this piece. Maybe I'll go back later and add them once I know where the piece will hang.

Copyright 2008 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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