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Hi, I'm Cyndi, and I've been writing and updating  Mixed Media Artist since 2005.  If you're a new visitor, welcome! Come tr...

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Tessellation tool online




Have fun with Interactivate: Tessellate!

If playing with this cool tool isn't enough, you can look at lots of tessellation art at the Tessellation Database. In addition, there's always Tessellations.org ...check out the tessellating frenchfries :-)

Here is one of my previous posts with ideas about how to use these patterns:
Expanded Squares:Making a digital stamp

Copyright 2008 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


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Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Making an abstract collage



Isaiah 44:21-23

"Remember these things, O Jacob,
for you are my servant, O Israel.
I have made you, you are my servant;
O Israel, I will not forget you.
I have swept away your offenses like a cloud,
your sins like the morning mist.
Return to me,
for I have redeemed you.”

Sing for joy, O heavens, for the LORD has done this;
shout aloud, O earth beneath.
Burst into song, you mountains,
you forests and all your trees,
for the LORD has redeemed Jacob,
he displays his glory in Israel."

Nita Leland writes, in Creative Collage Techniques:

With nonobjective design, the picture has no apparent reference to a subject….Instead, the formal elements of design are the picture. The picture is "about" color, line, or shape without a specific realistic image to create the visual sensation.

So here’s the problem: I can’t really tell you exactly how to make an abstract collage. I have no way of knowing which design elements are going to speak to you. My piece is a combination of cut and torn papers in analogous colors and similar shapes, and when I started out, I only had the vaguest notion of where it was going: it was going to be pink. Bright pink.

Some people won’t start working until they know what they’re going to do, but with abstracts it’s a whole different ballgame, at least for me. Once I had painted the canvas and glued down the first piece of tissue paper, the process took over. I don’t know at exactly what point that started to happen, just that it did.

So, I can tell you how I made this piece, but not why. I can tell you my steps, but I can’t direct your path. I would suggest that you do NOT make a copy of this piece, but rather just read through the instructions for the technical aspects…which are pretty darned simple…and then go make your own.


Materials & Tools

Sheet of canvas or watercolor paper
Acrylic paints (I used Jacquard’s Textile paint in pink)
Liquid polymer medium
Assorted papers, handpainted
Assorted pieces of tissue
Larger piece of heavy watercolor paper for mounting

Waxed or parchment paper
Foam brush
Scissors
Heat gun (optional)
Something to weight the piece flat


1. Paint your canvas with the background color of your choice. Don’t be neat about it!


2. Glue down a central piece of tissue paper with a vague pattern on it. Mush it up and make it crinkly and uneven.


3. Cut and tear pieces for your second layer. Arrange them and glue them down.


4. Add another layer of smaller shapes that mimic the pattern and colors of layer #2.

5. Brush a thin coat of polymer medium over the entire piece. Let it dry overnight.

6. Brush a thin coat of polymer medium on the back of the piece and mount it on watercolor paper. Cover it with waxed paper and weight it down with heavy books to dry.



Copyright 2009 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Digital manipulation with a torn paper landscape

Time and tide wait for no man.
~ Geoffrey Chaucer

Remember that torn paper landscape I made about a month ago? Here it is!




1. Create a torn paper landscape with the colors and papers of your choice.

2. Scan it and open the file in Photoshop or your favorite image editing software. All of the images that you want to use together will need to be saved at the same resolution, so pick your size and deal with your images now.

3. Duplicate your background layer, which will be the landscape.


4. Add your largest image, which will form a “frame” for the smaller ones you want to add. I desaturated my image, dragged it into place, and used the overlay mode for blending. The opacity was lowered until it looked right to me. In this case, it’s at about 30%.


5. Drag and drop your smaller images, each into its own layer. I put the image of the eyes on a transparent background, and used a soft erasing paintbrush to make the edges blend with the layers below.


Copyright 2008 Cyndi Lavin. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


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